Colonial Convents

One of my favourite things to do in Mexico is pueblear, which simply means to travel about from town to town. Over my travels and research trips I have visited several pueblos, and in a large portion of them one can still find former colonial convents erected by one of the three principal mendicant orders. These spaces represent more than just colonial domination and religious indoctrination, which religious friars and former generations of scholars called the “spiritual conquest”; they symbolize the cultural encounters, negotiations, and appropriations of colonial life in which both groups acculturated customs, ideas, material culture, and language from each other. Some of these buildings are in utter decay today, a few have been transformed into museums or other state buildings, and at least one has become a Protestant church. My goal in these photo essays is to capture the larger partnerships of colonial life through some of the most impressive symbols of Spanish colonial rule.

 

ACOLMAN, ESTADO DE MÉXICO, MEXICO (AUGUSTINIAN CONVENT)

ACTOPAN, HIDALGO, MEXICO (AUGUSTINIAN CONVENT)

HUEJOTZINGO, PUEBLA, MEXICO (FRANCISCAN CONVENT)

IZAMAL, YUCATÁN, MEXICO (FRANCISCAN CONVENT)

MALINALCO, ESTADO DE MÉXICO, MEXICO (AUGUSTINIAN CONVENT)

OAXACA, OAXACA, MEXICO (DOMINICAN CONVENT)

SAN ANDRÉS CALPAN, PUEBLA, MEXICO (FRANCISCAN CONVENT)

SAN NICOLÁS OXTOTICPAC, ESTADO DE MÉXICO, MEXICO (FRANCISCAN CONVENT)

SANTA MARÍA ATLIHUETZIA, TLAXCALA, MEXICO (FRANCISCAN CONVENT)

TECAMACHALCO, PUEBLA, MEXICO (FRANCISCAN CONVENT)

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